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9 Wine Trends for 2017

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Wine Trends for 2017

    Wine is becoming even more popular as people’s drink of choice. But how much do people actually know about wine? Or do most people just hope that the House Wine will be good enough for them? If you plan on drinking wine (or any alcohol really), you should really make sure that you know what you are drinking. How will it compliment the food that you are eating? How will it impress the people that you are dining with? If you can’t answer those questions then maybe it’s time for you to check out a site like beerandwine.guide to help you know exactly what wine is the best for any occasion.

  1. A Year for Sparkling Wines

    Millennials are important in driving the growth of sparkling wines. And, they aren’t limited for consumption only on special occasions only.

  2. Interest in Chilled Wine Won’t Cool

    More and more reds, especially lighter-bodied ones, are being served cooled. A major trend in chilled wine is growing with fruit-forward styles such as Beaujolais and grenache. Chilling these wines brings out the wines’ brightness and spirit. Will this be the year of ice added to red wine?

  3. Wine By the Glass to Increase in Popularity

    Red, white, rose – why not all three. Consumers like to experiment and they prefer to pair a wine with each course and for each individual’s taste.

  4. Demand for Organic, Biodynamic Wine to Increase

    In general there will be a huge demand for organically grown food. The idea remains same for wines as well, there will be a demand for natural wines meaning the grapes which are grown without use of chemicals and not harming the ecology of the soil. Given the aspirational attitude of Wine consumers, Small batch/Single Vineyards/Single Barrel type of exclusive wines will drive a lot of interest.

  5. Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon Will Continue to Dominate Sales

    However, there is a trend toward more diversity. French wine sales are up 23 percent and there are excellent wines available at competitive pricing, particularly from the southwest, Beaujolais Cru Gamay, sparkling Cremants, Languedoc Roussillon and Provence rose and white wines, like Petit Manseng. Others to consider include Spanish white Albariño, Cava and Rioja wines, Chilean and Argentinian reds and South African Chenin Blanc and Syrah. We are also likely to see more East Coast wines from New York, Virginia and Georgia available in Riesling, Viognier and French and American hybrids.

  6. The Wine Slushy to Rule this Summer

    For the summer, wine slushies, a take off from Sangrias, are a perfect recipe. Blending wine, fruit, and ice into a refreshing frozen drink.

  7. Bourbon Barrel Wine

    This is a current trend of 2016, and will definitely be something you’ll continue to see in 2017. Barrels that once held bourbon or whiskey are being refurbished and used to age wine. The oak barrels are charred for aroma and flavor. Adventurous wine drinkers are recommended to try it, which means more people are learning about this type of wine. The popularity of bourbon barrel wine is continuing to increase, and will definitely be a topic to talk about in 2017. So will you take a walk on the wild side and try this type of wine?

  8. Drinking Out Vs. Drinking In

    On-premise wine sales are on a decline, while off-premise wine sales are growing. People want to drink wine by the at home, rather than spend a lot of money on a bottle of wine while they’re out, where the price of a bottle can exceed the cost of the entire rest of the meal.

  9. Coming Out for Canned Wine

    One of the most surprising trends to hit the wine industry in quite some time is that of canned wine. In the past year alone, the sale of canned wine has nearly doubled, largely due to the millennial influence. Reds, whites, sparklers and everything in between can be put into a can without issue, and the end result is a convenient, portable and usually very affordable option that’s tailor-fit for the beach or for entertaining. In many ways, cans help to protect wine, as they don’t allow any light in and are even better at preventing oxidation than traditional corked bottles. There are a handful of cans out there right now, but 2017 will see an explosion of new entries to the market.

A Definitive Guide to Pairing Wine with Vegetables

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Wine Pairing with Vegetables

If you thought pairing wine with fruit is challenging, pairing a wine with vegetables is even more so.  Many vegetables have, such as asparagus and artichokes, and particularly green vegetables, have particular chemicals that interact poorly with many wines.  In addition, there can be an enormous difference between a raw vegetable and one that is roasted.

Check the table below for some of the best wine and vegetable pairings.

VegetablesWhite WineRed Wine
ArtichokesMuscadet, Sauvignon BlancBourdeaux
AsparagusGrüner Veltliner, Riesling, Sancerre, Sauvignon Blanc
Bean, lentilsSyrah (Shiraz), Merlot, Chianti Classico, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Côte du Rhône
Bell PeppersBeaujolais
Brussels SproutsRieslingPinot Noir
ChardPinot GrisGamay, Pinot Noir, Sangiovese
ChiliesZinfandel
CornChardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc
Eggplant, AubergineDry RoséChianti, Syrah
HummusAlbariño, Chenin BlancMerlot, Pinot Noir
KaleRiesling, Sancerre
Gamay
MushroomsDry Sherry
Pinot Noir
OlivesFino sherrySparkling Brut Rosé
OnionsGewürztraminer, Pinot Gris
Roasted/Grilled VegetablesViognierMerlot, Syrah, Zinfandel
SpinachChampagneGamay
TomatoesSauvignon BlancSangiovese
TrufflesChampagneBarolo, French Burgundy, Syrah
ZucchiniBeaujolais, Sangiovese

A Definitive Guide to Pairing Wine with Fruit

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Friut platter and wine

Pairing wine with fruit can be challenging but a great pairing can create an absolutely phenomenal experience.  Some pairings are pretty obvious like strawberries and champagne.  Others, much less so such as apples and a Cabernet.

The chart below makes the process of choosing a great pairing easier.

FruitWhite WineRed Wine
ApplesAsti Spumante, Champagne, Chardonnay, White ZinfandelCabernet
ApricotsChenin Blanc
AvocadosAlbariño, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc
BananasGewürztraminer, Madeira, Sauternes,Sauvignon BlancMerlot
BlackberriesMuscat, Riesling, SancerreChâteauneuf-du-Pape, Sangiovese, Rioja, Tempranillo, Zinfandel
BlueberriesAsti Spumante
CherriesMuscatPinot Noir, Port
FigsSherryChianti, Port, Syrah
GrapesChampagne
GuavaRiesling, SancerreRioja, Sangiovese
KiwiRieslingFleurie
Mangos Vouvray
Barolo, Barbaresco, Bardolino
MelonsIce Wine, Muscat, VouvrayBarolo, Barbaresco, Bardolino
OrangeOrange Muscat
PeachesAsti Spumante, Champagne, Chardonnay, Sweet Rieslings from Germany or AlsaceBeaujolais, Bourgueil
PearsAsti Spumante, Chardonnay, White ZinfandelBordeaux
PineappleIce Wine, German Riesling, Sauterne
PlumsBeaujolais, Bordeaux, Bouscueil, Merlot, Tempranillo
StrawberriesChampagne, Ice Wine, Sweet Muscat
TomatoesSauvignon Blanc
WatermelonRose Champagne

 

 

Best Dessert Wine Pairings

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Dessert wines are often over-looked yet can truly enhance your epicurean experience. Whether you want to buy your wine online, go into a store, or visit a winery – without the knowledge on good wines to pair with your desserts, you’ll come away with a wine that won’t heighten your dining experience as it should. A few simple guidelines should make it a fun exercise! The golden rule for pairing wine with with desserts: The wine should be sweeter than the dessert. Then, match the flavor intensity of the dessert with the flavor intensity of the wine.

Firstly, back to the golden rule for pairing wine with desserts – the wine should be sweeter than the dessert. Secondly, match the flavor profile of the dessert with the flavor profile of the wine. Here are more specific tips:

  • PX (Pedro Ximénez) – this is a luscious Spanish dessert sherry wine made from dried grapes. This wine is so sweet with strong flavors of raisins and molasses, it can simply be poured over vanilla ice cream. Pair with bread pudding, white or dark chocolate desserts, and orange flavored desserts.
  • Sauternes – Sauternes are characterized by a balance of sweetness with the zest of some acidity. Common flavor notes include apricots, honey, peaches but slightly nutty. Try a Sauterne with Creme Brûlée, apple tart tatin, peach pie, or an English Trifle.
  • Ice Wine – Or, Icewine, are refreshingly sweet with high acidity. They typically have a medium to full body with a long lingering finish. The nose is usually reminiscent of pear, peach, dried apricot, citrus,honey, figs, caramel, and green apple. Riesling style Ice Wines, which are quite common, can be paired with key lime pie, lemon tarts, fruit tarts, or fruit-based creme brûlée. Or, drink all by itself.
  • Tawny Port – A Tawny Port with it slightly sweet yet nutty, caramel flavors pairs well with fruit cakes, mince pies, and eggy pastries including custards and flans.
  • Ruby Port – Try a Ruby Port, which has fruity notes and easy tannins pairs well with a decadent but not too sweet chocolate dessert. It goes with a chocolate cake with a raspberry sauce, or a dark chocolate fondue, or a simple chocolate brownie.
  • Late Harvest Zinfandel – Find dried cherry and chocolate notes in Late Harvest Zinfandels. These dessert wines go well with of course chocolate and chocolate desserts. Also try it with cheesecakes, cherry pies, and carrot cakes.

One last rule of thumb – leave room for dessert!!!

Spring into Summer with Rosé Wines

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Different Shades of Rose Wine

Italian Rosé

Prosecco producers call their rosé sparkling wines Spumante (technically, Prosecco can only be made from white grapes). The best are lively 
and fruity. It is fragrant with summer fruit aromas, fresh and lively on the palate, dry, crisp and easy to drink.

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Wine Pairing Basics

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Oh to have such troubles as choosing the right libation with the right vittles, this surely is a trifle of the modern world.

That’s enough of waxing poetic, the truth of the matter is that wine is great and food is great, but the manner in which you’re supposed to put the two together can be a downright mysterious. If you continue reading, you can learn to understand some of the basic pairings, if some of these pairings you’ve never tried before, perhaps take a look at something like this GraysOnline wine delivery or alternative wine delivery services and look to purchase some wines you so you’re able to test some untried wine and food pairings.

Well, you’re in luck, because we’re going to unravel that mystery and by the end of the article you will wax poetic about the harmony of the perfect grape accent on a cheese vestibule (or something close to that).

Meat Eaters

When you’re eating meat you need something hefty and powerful to balance out the flavors. A Beaujolais is one of those few wines that will fit the bill across a variety of meat dishes.

Going into particulars you’re going to want wines that are low in tannins like Beaujolais or Dolcetto.

On the flip side if you’re eating steak you can take in some tannin and enjoy the boldness. You’re going to find that boldness in a beautiful Bordeaux or Barolo, which after a sip and then a bite will get you humming M’ama Mia.

Chicken

A simple chicken dish deserves a simple wine that together provides harmony and a settled in feeling. A feathery Chardonnay will give you an almost perfect pairing with chicken every time. The only times you may want to stray is when you get into heavier chicken dishes with creams and fats, in this case you can go with a Merlot or Beaujolais.

Seafood

Delicate things like other delicate things in life and on the palate. So if you’re enjoying light dishes like a seafood dish you want to pair that with a light wine like a Chablis or an effervescent Pinot Grigio.

Sour Foods

If you’re noshing on something that makes your toes curl in sour ecstasy then take a sip of Sauvignon Blanc to further the good-oh-so-good.

Spicy Foods

If you’re whipping up some spicy Indian or Thai then you’re going to want to balance out all of those sharp (but delicious) flavors with something sweet. A great choice is a Riesling, which has a kiss of sweet with a whole lot of body.

Good ‘ol BBQ

Mesquite, sweet or honey garlic good, whatever you’ve got on the BBQ a Shiraz can handle for sure. Wines that have that special kickback spice note like Shiraz and Malbec are big and bold enough to handle the strong flavors a sweet smoky BBQ can bring. In fact the added spice those wines bring to the table can take your BBQ from ordinary to extraordinary.

Getting Cheesy

We all know about the love affair between wine and cheese, and we also know that some of the couplings are better than others. However, if you choose yourself a dry rose wine – you can’t go wrong. A dry fruit rose wine has just the right dimensions to have flings with all sorts of cheese types and keep them all happy all of the time.

Salty Foods

Bubbles and bubbles can make champagne fun enough to drink on its own, but when you pair this sweet treat with something salty … well Hello!

Sparkling wines always have sweet undertones which is why pairing them with a cut of cheese is just about the best way to accent their flavor and enjoy the bounty on your tongue.

Sweet Foods

And to end off your meal you are going to want a sweet celebration of all that was had and all that is going to ensue. Desserts are paired best with complex wines that provide just the right balance of sweet to accent your post meal dish.

Muscats are particularly lovely with dessert as are Madeiras and this may be a surprise but a Riesling doesn’t fare too badly either.

Food and Wine Basics

Although you may not be registering in a Sommelier school near you anytime soon, the information you’re now armed with will give you a head up on anyone else anywhere you go.

Although there are numerous other wines to explore, these basics we’ve provided in this introduction to wine basics will give you a perfect foothold in this little world of the perfect sip’n bite.

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