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9 Food Trends for 2017

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Healthy Sushi Burger

  1. Dine-out is Out and Dine-in in In

    Dine-out only food businesses will increasingly be offering delivery only options and brands. UberEats, the food delivery brand for Uber, is making it easier and easier for high-end restaurant meals delivered to straight to your home, hot, ready to eat!

  2. Faux food

    We’ve reached a tipping point for vegetables. Millennial are pushing animal protein to the side of the plate … or entirely off it. With the rising prices of animal protein products, concerns with hormones, and healthy diet concerns, more and more option will find its way into restaurants and grocery stores, and the creation of whole new food product brands. Venture capitalists have begun investing in food companies that are developing vegetarians-based foods that taste like animal proteins, or close facsimiles.

  3. Seaweed Savior

    Expect to see many more food options, including faux foods discussed above, using seaweed and a major ingredient. Seaweed is not only healthy and abundant, its umami flavors are exactly what is needed to boost animal protein-like flavors in vegetarian foods.

  4. Sweet and Spicy is In!

    While our appetites for spicy dishes continues to grow, it is expanding to the realm of sweet things. Think chili and chocolate. Or, jalapeño with honey, stuffed sweet potatoes with Sriracha, Thai chili lime mayo, and grilled watermelon gazpacho.

  5. Food Porn Continues to Grow

    The #foodporn hashtag will continue to grow eyeballs in 2017. Obsessed by chocolate, keen on coffee and mad about prawns, gourmands from around the world share their photos on Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Facebook. Think frankenshakes, chocolate cookie dirt, multi-layer stacked burgers, and ooey gooey cheesy dishes.

  6. Rethinking Pasta

    Noodles made from chickpeas, quinoa, rice flour, flax seed and lentils are still gaining popularity (reminder, they’re gluten-free). For the “zoodle” fans out there, spiralized veggies will continue to own the spotlight, along with other exciting plant options, like kelp noodles.

  7. Africa is the New Ethnic Cuisine

    America’s growing multicultural population is behind the charge for more international food. Relatively under-explored in the United States, African flavors and ingredients increasingly pop up on menus across the country. So savvy foodies are adapting menus to include more dishes rich in whole grains, beans, vegetables and exotic African spice blends from the second-largest continent in the world.

  8. Wellness Tonics

    Forget sugary, vitamin-infused waters—new hyper-functional, ultra-healthy, virtually medicinal beverages are about to flood the market. Tonics with botanicals that have roots in alternative medicine will be popular in 2017. Whether you’re in need of an energy boost, focusing your thoughts, or quality shut-eye, there’s a drink for that—no specialty store required. The most popular ingredients include kava, holy basil, apple cider vinegar, medicinal mushrooms, and maca and ashwagandha. Experience turmeric tonic or cayenne infused Chili Mocha to fight inflammation and free radicals.

  9. Fermentation is In

    Fermentation has fascinated chefs for years as they’ve tried to uncover new ways to create naturally complex flavors with nuanced textures and bright fresh colors. While home chefs have dabbled in rotting foods, the home kitchen hasn’t yet really broken out into mainstream but it will in 2017. Restaurant chefs will likely play into the growing notion that older, bubbling, cultured, and fermented foods are better for your health, for flavor, and for planet earth.

9 Wine Trends for 2017

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Wine Trends for 2017

  1. A Year for Sparkling Wines

    Millennials are important in driving the growth of sparkling wines. And, they aren’t limited for consumption only on special occasions only.

  2. Interest in Chilled Wine Won’t Cool

    More and more reds, especially lighter-bodied ones, are being served cooled. A major trend in chilled wine is growing with fruit-forward styles such as Beaujolais and grenache. Chilling these wines brings out the wines’ brightness and spirit. Will this be the year of ice added to red wine?

  3. Wine By the Glass to Increase in Popularity

    Red, white, rose – why not all three. Consumers like to experiment and they prefer to pair a wine with each course and for each individual’s taste.

  4. Demand for Organic, Biodynamic Wine to Increase

    In general there will be a huge demand for organically grown food. The idea remains same for wines as well, there will be a demand for natural wines meaning the grapes which are grown without use of chemicals and not harming the ecology of the soil. Given the aspirational attitude of Wine consumers, Small batch/Single Vineyards/Single Barrel type of exclusive wines will drive a lot of interest.

  5. Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon Will Continue to Dominate Sales

    However, there is a trend toward more diversity. French wine sales are up 23 percent and there are excellent wines available at competitive pricing, particularly from the southwest, Beaujolais Cru Gamay, sparkling Cremants, Languedoc Roussillon and Provence rose and white wines, like Petit Manseng. Others to consider include Spanish white Albariño, Cava and Rioja wines, Chilean and Argentinian reds and South African Chenin Blanc and Syrah. We are also likely to see more East Coast wines from New York, Virginia and Georgia available in Riesling, Viognier and French and American hybrids.

  6. The Wine Slushy to Rule this Summer

    For the summer, wine slushies, a take off from Sangrias, are a perfect recipe. Blending wine, fruit, and ice into a refreshing frozen drink.

  7. Bourbon Barrel Wine

    This is a current trend of 2016, and will definitely be something you’ll continue to see in 2017. Barrels that once held bourbon or whiskey are being refurbished and used to age wine. The oak barrels are charred for aroma and flavor. Adventurous wine drinkers are recommended to try it, which means more people are learning about this type of wine. The popularity of bourbon barrel wine is continuing to increase, and will definitely be a topic to talk about in 2017. So will you take a walk on the wild side and try this type of wine?

  8. Drinking Out Vs. Drinking In

    On-premise wine sales are on a decline, while off-premise wine sales are growing. People want to drink wine by the at home, rather than spend a lot of money on a bottle of wine while they’re out, where the price of a bottle can exceed the cost of the entire rest of the meal.

  9. Coming Out for Canned Wine

    One of the most surprising trends to hit the wine industry in quite some time is that of canned wine. In the past year alone, the sale of canned wine has nearly doubled, largely due to the millennial influence. Reds, whites, sparklers and everything in between can be put into a can without issue, and the end result is a convenient, portable and usually very affordable option that’s tailor-fit for the beach or for entertaining. In many ways, cans help to protect wine, as they don’t allow any light in and are even better at preventing oxidation than traditional corked bottles. There are a handful of cans out there right now, but 2017 will see an explosion of new entries to the market.

A Definitive Guide to Pairing Wine with Vegetables

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Wine Pairing with Vegetables

If you thought pairing wine with fruit is challenging, pairing a wine with vegetables is even more so.  Many vegetables have, such as asparagus and artichokes, and particularly green vegetables, have particular chemicals that interact poorly with many wines.  In addition, there can be an enormous difference between a raw vegetable and one that is roasted.

Check the table below for some of the best wine and vegetable pairings.

VegetablesWhite WineRed Wine
ArtichokesMuscadet, Sauvignon BlancBourdeaux
AsparagusGrüner Veltliner, Riesling, Sancerre, Sauvignon Blanc
Bean, lentilsSyrah (Shiraz), Merlot, Chianti Classico, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Côte du Rhône
Bell PeppersBeaujolais
Brussels SproutsRieslingPinot Noir
ChardPinot GrisGamay, Pinot Noir, Sangiovese
ChiliesZinfandel
CornChardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc
Eggplant, AubergineDry RoséChianti, Syrah
HummusAlbariño, Chenin BlancMerlot, Pinot Noir
KaleRiesling, Sancerre
Gamay
MushroomsDry Sherry
Pinot Noir
OlivesFino sherrySparkling Brut Rosé
OnionsGewürztraminer, Pinot Gris
Roasted/Grilled VegetablesViognierMerlot, Syrah, Zinfandel
SpinachChampagneGamay
TomatoesSauvignon BlancSangiovese
TrufflesChampagneBarolo, French Burgundy, Syrah
ZucchiniBeaujolais, Sangiovese

A Definitive Guide to Pairing Wine with Fruit

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Friut platter and wine

Pairing wine with fruit can be challenging but a great pairing can create an absolutely phenomenal experience.  Some pairings are pretty obvious like strawberries and champagne.  Others, much less so such as apples and a Cabernet.

The chart below makes the process of choosing a great pairing easier.

FruitWhite WineRed Wine
ApplesAsti Spumante, Champagne, Chardonnay, White ZinfandelCabernet
ApricotsChenin Blanc
AvocadosAlbariño, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc
BananasGewürztraminer, Madeira, Sauternes,Sauvignon BlancMerlot
BlackberriesMuscat, Riesling, SancerreChâteauneuf-du-Pape, Sangiovese, Rioja, Tempranillo, Zinfandel
BlueberriesAsti Spumante
CherriesMuscatPinot Noir, Port
FigsSherryChianti, Port, Syrah
GrapesChampagne
GuavaRiesling, SancerreRioja, Sangiovese
KiwiRieslingFleurie
Mangos Vouvray
Barolo, Barbaresco, Bardolino
MelonsIce Wine, Muscat, VouvrayBarolo, Barbaresco, Bardolino
OrangeOrange Muscat
PeachesAsti Spumante, Champagne, Chardonnay, Sweet Rieslings from Germany or AlsaceBeaujolais, Bourgueil
PearsAsti Spumante, Chardonnay, White ZinfandelBordeaux
PineappleIce Wine, German Riesling, Sauterne
PlumsBeaujolais, Bordeaux, Bouscueil, Merlot, Tempranillo
StrawberriesChampagne, Ice Wine, Sweet Muscat
TomatoesSauvignon Blanc
WatermelonRose Champagne

 

 

Dry Aging Beef at Home

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Different Cuts of BeefDry-aged steak has superior flavor and texture over non-aged beef, but it’s expensive. Prime cuts of beef may cost upwards of $20 per pound with dry-aged beef as much as 25% to 50% more per pound. Is it possible to dry-age steaks at home?

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Pairing Wine with Cheese

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There is perhaps no more perfect pairing than that of wine and cheese. Their subtle flavors and textures are a natural complement to one another, and with endless varieties of each, matchmaking opportunities abound.

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The Best Method to Store Cheese

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Cheese Storage BagsStoring cheese presents a conundrum: As it sits, it releases moisture. If this moisture evaporates, the cheese dries out. If the moisture is trapped, it encourages mold. Cheese, properly stored, keeps longer, and that means less waste and expense. The goal is to keep air out without suffocating the wedge in plastic.

Specialty cheese paper avoids this problem with a two-ply construction that lets cheese breathe without drying out. However, it is not readily available at most local markets.

The best home method to store cheese is to use waxed or parchment paper which is loosely wrapped with aluminum foil. Both papers wick moisture away, while the foil cover traps just enough water to keep the cheese from drying out. Wrapped this way, even super-perishable goat cheese keeps for about a week, and brie and cheddar were can last potentially for more than a month. Cheese paper extends the life of these cheeses by only maybe a few days more.

But if you want to splurge on the best…

The Best Way to Whip Egg Whites

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Whippeing Egg WhitesEgg whites should be whipped immediately before needed, as their delicate structure necessitates their immediate use—particularly if beaten in a mixer. There are also two ways to futher help stabilize the egg whites: a copper bowl and cream of tartar.

To a lesser extent, sugar also helps to stabilize egg whites because it delays water evaporation by attracting moisture, giving the eggs protein structure more time to set up. The whites can then be beaten longer without harmful consequences.

Egg whites are finicky and demand optimal conditions for whipping. A mere speck of yolk, oil, butter, or other fat captured in the whites will markedly reduce the maximum volume the foam can attain, as fats obstruct the formation of the whipped eggs to the desired consistency and volume. It is essential to keep egg whites and all equipment that will come in contact with them—bowl, whip, spoons, and spatulas—fat-free. If fat is to blame when a batch of egg whites refuses to whip up, the damage done is irreversible. There’s nothing to do but clean everything up and start over.

Separating the eggs is the next important step. Eggs separate most easily and cleanly when refrigerator-cold because the yolk is firmer and so less likely to break. It is best to take the chill off the whites before whipping.

Your choice of mixing bowl will also affect your success with whipped whites. Bowls made from plastic, a petroleum product with a porous surface, retain an oily film even when washed carefully and should not be used for whipping egg whites. The foam will never reach its optimal volume, no matter how long it is beaten. Glass and ceramic should be avoided as well, as their slippery surfaces make it harder for whites to billow up. Aluminum, which tends to gray whites, should also be avoided. The two best choices are stainless steel and, for those who have it, copper.

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